Filed under International Development

Why I use the term ‘Majority world’ instead of ‘developing countries’ or ‘Third world’

As you may have noticed in my blog posts, I avoid using the terms ‘developing world’ or ‘Third world’. Instead, I use the term ‘Majority world’. Here’s why. The terms ‘developing world’ and ‘Third world’ imply that ‘development’ is a standard, linear process, and that certain ‘developed’ countries have finished ‘developing’ and are the norm towards … Continue reading

Learning about learning: What affects children’s learning in Sindh, Pakistan?

Recently, the Aga Khan Foundation (AKF) released a publication summarizing and reflecting upon major research studies carried out alongside AKF’s education initiatives in ten countries (Tajikistan, Kyrgyzstan, Pakistan, Bangladesh, India, Kenya, Tanzania, Uganda, Mozambique, and Portugal). For each study, the publication provides a brief introduction to the programme, an overview of the study design, and a summary of … Continue reading

Research ethics: Respecting cultural values while trying to ‘do no harm’ in Pakistan

I was invited to contribute an ethics case study for the “Ethical Research Involving Children: International Charter and Guidelines”. [UPDATE Oct. 30, 2013: The charter has now been published and can be found with additional resources at this website: Ethical Research Involving Children.] In my previous post I described the background context and ethical challenge. Here is … Continue reading

Research ethics: Implementing international guidelines in complex local realities

Many of us who engage in research with children, especially in diverse contexts of the world, often struggle with ethical concerns. In response to this, a group of international researchers has been developing an international set of guidelines and considerations for ethical research with children. The document “Ethical Research Involving Children: International Charter and Guidelines” … Continue reading

Educational and other effects of giving children tablets for learning: Critical questions on the One Laptop Per Child approach

Recent news articles have been discussing the One Laptop Per Child (OLPC) project being implemented in various parts of the Majority World. Here’s an article at Mashable, and another at Dvice. Basically, the OLPC programme recently gave tablets to Grade-1-aged children in two remote Ethiopian villages. OLPC has given tablets to children before. What was different … Continue reading

Learning and development in context

Learning and development occur within social and physical contexts. Not only do learning and development occur within contexts, but in fact are shaped by contexts. Over the last few years, I have had opportunities to work with child development and early education programmes in various global contexts. In one of my earlier experiences working in the Majority … Continue reading